Music

It was the summer of 1981 and we were visiting family in Louisville, Kentucky. Rick Springfield was on the turntable and the words of Jessie’s Girl belted through the speakers shaking the windows.

“Wow, that’s loud,” I yelled at Chuck and David, my cousins.

“Yup,” David said, his blue eyes nearly closing as his mouth curled into a smile.

I was jealous. Sure, we had a turntable at home, but the only records I had for it were story time read alongs. How boring!

The music continued to shake the house and we began to run around the pool table. Each of us were too short to play, but David, Chuck, and my brother Dan were whooping it up. Their home was far more exciting that our house in Pennsylvania, but the excitement was short lived.

“Danny, Laura, time for bed,” Mom yelled down the stairs. Chuck turned the turntable off and Mom, Dad, Dan and I headed out to the camper for a night’s rest.

I went to sleep with the tune of Jessie’s Girl playing in my mind. How did they get to listen to such music, the suggestion of a girl loving a man with his body? Their parents were pretty cool! Sure, my parents were pretty cool too, but not like that!

Dad took us camping and we did tons of fun stuff, and Mom clipped coupons and watched sales so that she could use leftover grocery money to buy us books from the Scholastic book club. It would take me years to have the guts to listen to a song like Jessie’s Girl with my parents in hearing distance!

About Laura

Writing is a passion for me, a healing process from past abuse, and a show of strength to other MEN and women that have endured or are enduring. Happiness is around the corner, reach for it, attain it, and embrace it, even if that means walking away.
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13 Responses to Music

  1. Alan says:

    Very nicely done. I like how you show the thoughts and perspective of your younger self.

  2. yaloo says:

    Nicely written story and I see some of the things in your writing that you suggested for me to use in mine! Thank you!

  3. Christine F. says:

    Hey-really cute story! Just fyi – I noticed you repeat the word ‘ and’ within this sentence as well as the word ‘turn’ twice. Here’s the sentence: ‘Chuck turned the turntable off and Mom, Dad, Dan and I headed out to the camper for a night’s rest.’ Maybe it would flow better if you said something like “Chuck switched off the turntable. Mom, Dad, Dan and I headed to the camper for a night’s rest.’ I see the word ‘and’ repeated here 4 times in this sentence also:’Dad took us camping and we did tons of fun stuff, and Mom clipped coupons and watched sales so that she could use leftover grocery money to buy us books from the Scholastic book club.’ Maybe try instead ‘Dad took us camping and we did tons of fun stuff. Mom clipped coupons and watched sales so she could use leftover grocery money to buy us books……’ Do you agree that this might help the flow?

  4. susieshy says:

    I liked the way you started off your memoir.
    You said, ‘ It was the spring of 1981″. It made me want to read more. That was a good hook because I have lived in 1981 too, as a child. You took me through your childhood with your words. Each child does go through a phase when he/she thinks someone else’s parents are way cooler than my own and you have described this very well.
    I must say your mum sounds very cool, the way she bought books for you and inculcated the habit of reading in you, which is surely helpful to you as a writer.

    • Thank you, Susieshy! My dad is the avid reader, but Mom bought the books. They both set me up for a love of reading and writing. I couldn’t be more grateful than I am for that. Thank you for your feedback!

  5. JanisClare says:

    Wonderful details. Good use of quotes. and yet, something’s missing…
    I need you to wrap it up better.
    I really enjoy your comments, often because I want to say the exact same thing you’ve already said!!—-so I feel a connection here—-and, in that spirit, I want to be honest with you. I hope we can still chat after this …
    I read this a couple of times and never got the point. I think you’re saying your parents were fuddy-duddies and your cousins’ parents were cool. Or was it your cousins were cool and you were just noticing cool-ness? Or was it you never knew what cool was….
    Can you see where I’m going with this?
    It’s like you’ve got all the elements for a good story except for the point of it….
    Maybe I’m the only one who had difficulty here… maybe it’s me. If so, I’ll accept that I’m thick as bricks. But even bricksters like me can use some help from the author!

    • That is an excellent point! Don’t worry we can still chat and I really appreciate your honesty. The story tumbles through my mind every time I hear the song, I suppose somewhere along the way I lost the plot 🙁 Sleep first and edits in the morning. 🙂

  6. lmcmahon says:

    I thought it was a great story! Well written! The point I took away from the short story was that you had deep respect and appreciation for your parents as a young person, even if they were not as “cool” as your cousin’s parents. It would take many years for you to become your parents equal.
    Your quote: “It would take me years to have the guts to listen to a song like Jessie’s Girl with my parents in hearing distance!”

    • Thanks for your input, lmcmahon. I do feel the story needs work. I’m glad you got one of the main points. 🙂 I feel I need a better focus on why I felt compelled to write this. What makes this memory so special? Thank you for taking the time to read my story and I enjoyed your feedback.

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